TIME AND QCA: A CONTRARIAN VIEW

For a long time, QCA-researchers have been concerned with time and have endeavoured to account for time in QCA. In this blog, I argue that such efforts are misguided. That QCA is time agnostic (which…

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Causal mechanisms, some second thoughts

Causal mechanisms seem to be the preferred language for social scientists to talk about causality.The mechanism is what connects cause and outcome, independent and dependent variable. Causalmechanisms talk is attractive for both qualitative and quantitative…

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Causality in the social sciences: Forget about regularities

I believe that social science is about people doing stuff. This phrase I borrowed from Paul Benneworth, a brilliant colleague and a good friend who left this world much too soon. People doing stuff draws…

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Roel Rutten has officially become Visiting Professor at Northumbria University Newcastle in the United Kingdom

Congratulations for Roel Rutten on being the Visiting Professor at Northumbria University Newcastle in the United Kingdom.

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The organization of knowledge creation

The organization of innovation and knowledge creation is concerned with the question, which combinations of conditions equip organizations with the ability to produce innovations and create knowledge and how and why do they do so?…

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The geography of innovation and knowledge creation

The geography of innovation and knowledge creation focuses on two questions: i) Why is geographical proximity still relevant for innovation and knowledge creation, and ii) Why does innovation and knowledge creation happen in some places…

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Qualitative Comparative Analysis (QCA)

QCA is a comparative case-study method. It uses Boolean algebra and formal logic to identify cross-case regularities. These regularities are substantively interpreted into causal mechanisms on the basis of case-based, contextual and theoretical knowledge. That…

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